Why We Do What We Do

What a delight to experience one of those “aha” moments when lost in a great book. Aha! That’s how it’s done, or–Aha! Who would have guessed she’d react like that!

We read to learn, to increase our knowledge, to be entertained; to visit other lives and other worlds and other ways of thinking. Unfortunately, far too many “aha” moments are lost to the current system of industrial-sized publishers and follow-the-latest-trend marketing. And so, we’ll do what we can to keep the “aha” moments coming and continue the search for worthy titles and their as-yet-unheralded authors. Wish us well. We’re working for you, discerning readers, to bring you whatever unique and worthy nuggets, fact or fiction, that we can find.

 

FICTION
NON-FICTION
We seek work that both entertains and stimulates thought; writing of great humor or profound ideas, bursting with creativity and unusual insight.
We search for writing that explores and educates; that shares and teaches; that points out and passes on key information to enrich our lives.

 

We live in a do-it-yourself era that has in many ways decentralized the power of yesterday’s monoliths and gatekeepers. And as so many of the new generation ofpublishers has a very personal vested interest in their product, we should be hopeful in regards to the future of books—or ebooks—or audio books—or whatever form of written or spoken communication is around the corner.

Lofty words, perhaps, from a tiny publisher with but a single non-fiction title to its credit. But sharing a philosophy is never bad. For this publisher it’s our declaration of motivation and mission. Our next book might also be non-fiction, perhaps even less important to the world as a whole than a guide for beer and wine drinkers.

But like A Beer Drinker’s Guide To Knowing And Enjoying Fine Wine, it will be a work that reflects its author’s love of his or her subject.  And that’s the key.  Be it a guide to this or that, a how-to, or a when-we-were-there, or a novel of insight or imagination, what we hope all our works will convey is the passion or the expertise or the excitement of their creator.

Perhaps we’ll find a Ford or a Hemingway or an Algren or Bukowski in our future catalog, along with yet-to-be standards of non-fiction beauty and informational excellence. But whatever pearls we may discover, we sit now at the foot of a great pile of oysters, anxious to begin shucking. With optimism.